Massage Therapy Training: What to Expect

Those interested in working in natural health care services will find that massage therapy training is a great way to help in healing. In addition, massage therapy training programs introduce candidates to productively working in health and wellness clubs, chiropractic clinics, cruise ships, spas and salons, hospitals and other health-related facilities.

While no two massage therapy training courses are identical, typical instruction entails basic studies in anatomy, physiology, pathology and kinesiology – where it goes from there is entirely dependent upon the healing arts school in which one enrolls. For example, if you would like a foundational course in bodywork, then common techniques taught in most massage therapy training programs encompass Swedish massage, sports massage and deep tissue massage. However, if you would like to take more advanced massage therapy training, then a large number of alternative health schools may provide in-depth, practical training a wider assortment of massage modalities.

Some of these massage therapy training programs include fascinating techniques that are steadily gaining in popularity. For instance, reflexology is a unique massage therapy that involves the hands, feet and ears. Other fine examples of stand-alone massage therapy training programs may include practical instruction in Tuina (Chinese medical massage), Shiatsu (a form of acupressure), meridian therapy, Rolfing, Alexander Technique, Feldenkrais, trigger point therapy, Indian head massage, among others.

Typically, most massage therapy training programs start at 300 hours and go above 1,000 training hours. Depending on the specific healing arts school or vocational college, students can elect to participate in an associate of applied science degree in massage therapy course as well.

In general, students engaged in one of several massage therapy training programs will learn that the majority of States regulate the practice; therefore, future massage therapists must complete some level of education and instruction in order to pass national certification exams and/or State examinations. Also, it is important for prospective students to carefully review potential massage therapy training programs to determine if the course has been accredited, types of massage modalities offered, course curriculum and whether classes meet all standards and requirements in order to become practicing massage therapists.

Because massage therapy is ever-growing in popularity, more and more individuals are turning to this non-invasive, relaxing method of health maintenance. So for students, who are seeking a promising, personally and professionally rewarding career, a massage therapy training course may be the route to take. Today, students who have successfully completed all educational requirements and certification through a massage therapy training program can anticipate earnings averaging about $31/hour.

Overall, massage therapy training programs are excellent for those who desire to provide natural healthcare services to patients and clients, alike. As a worthwhile means of employment, the field of massage therapy is expected to increase faster than average* over the next several years. (*Citation: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.)

If you (or someone you know) are interested in finding massage therapy training, let career training within fast-growing industries like massage therapy, cosmetology, acupuncture, oriental medicine, Reiki, and others get you started! Explore career school programs near you.Massage Therapy Training: What to Expect

© Copyright 2007. The CollegeBound Network. All Rights Reserved.

Resource Box: CarolAnn Bailey-Lloyd – Freelance Writer and Web Consultant for HolisticJunction.com, in association with CollegeSurfing.com – Educational Resources for Massage Therapy Training, Massage Programs, and other Natural Health Schools.